THE REACH OF DENOMINATIONAL AUTHORITY

Denominational authority over a local congregation or its property is rarely extinguishable at the local level. If it is severable, the process is likely long and arduous. The process often depends upon unilateral agreement by the denomination which is historically unlikely to be obtained for any reason. Indeed, it is so unlikely the better plan is simply to develop external resources and then quietly exit the denominational local church, leaving behind a shell.

In Cedar Grove Baptist Church v Barnham, Slip Op. (Unpublished) (NJ App Div., 2019), the pastor advised the denomination he was leaving the denomination and taking the church with him. Apparently, however, his plan was not known, and later not supported, by the church he served. Indeed, in the ensuing battle over the local church property, the church leadership appointed a new pastor and then sued to enjoin the former pastor from control or presence on the church property. The trial court granted the injunction and the appellate court affirmed.

While instinctively church members think of the local church and its property as “theirs” and not the denomination’s property, this is rarely totally true. If a church has been a member of a denomination for many decades generations of the faithful have contributed to its existence. While the current generation may disdain the denominational roots, the denomination speaks for the generations that went before that now have no other voice. However that may be, denominations that themselves “go rogue” or no longer meet the need of a particular local church cannot stop a group of members from leaving and organizing under a different banner using their own resources. While growth by fission is painful, it is not illegal.

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