MANDATORY CHURCH MEDIATIONS

While placing a church under external supervision is a rare exercise in judicial power, it is not unheard of. We have reported on imposition of Special Masters, especially to determine membership or supervise elections. Mediators and Special Masters are not always different species. Also, mediators sometimes do not use shuttle diplomacy between striving factions but rather impose procedures, as do sometimes Special Masters, so that the resolution process may advance. If a church split is bad enough, and cannot be resolved merely by reviewing organizational documents, then a mediator or Special Master may be appointed.

In Eskridge v Peacock, Slip Op. (Miss. App. 2018), after the death of a pastor, two striving factions emerged each attempting to appoint the next pastor. There appeared to also be a fracture in recognized church leadership that made congregational rule either a stalemate or problematic. To resolve the impasse, the trial court appointed a mediator with instructions to conduct a congregational election. The mediator appointed was the denominational authority to which the church appeared to belong. Indeed, the court had to take testimony to confirm the church was part of the denomination appointed to mediate. A new pastor was elected under the supervision of the mediator but the losing faction appealed. The appellate court held that appointment of a mediator to supervise the congregational vote and ordering enforcement of the result, but not otherwise dictating the choice of pastor, did not entangle the trial court in ecclesiastical matters so the trial court was affirmed.

Churches may wish to contemplate in their bylaws mandating the appointment of an identified mediator in to be used in the event of court action. Possible mediators could include denominational authority, bible college faculty, or a particular accounting or lawfirm. Indeed, the language of the appointment could also include mandatory pre-litigation requirements that such a process be undertaken. The language should also specify the powers of the mediator or Special Master. A funding mechanism should also be spelled out. Demanding the challenger pay half or all of the cost may keep out all but serious challengers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s